!!> PDF / Epub ☁ God ✍ Author Reza Aslan – Bassgrotto.co.uk

God In Layered Prose And With Thoughtful, Accessible Scholarship, Aslan Narrates The History Of Religion As A Remarkably Cohesive Attempt To Understand The Divine By Giving It Human Traits And Emotions According To Aslan, This Innate Desire To Humanize God Is Hardwired In Our Brains, Making It A Central Feature Of Nearly Every Religious Tradition As Aslan Writes, Whether We Are Aware Of It Or Not, And Regardless Of Whether We Re Believers Or Not, What The Vast Majority Of Us Think About When We Think About God Is A Divine Version Of Ourselves But This Projection Is Not Without Consequences We Bestow Upon God Not Just All That Is Good In Human Nature Our Compassion, Our Thirst For Justice But All That Is Bad In It Our Greed, Our Bigotry, Our Penchant For Violence All These Qualities Inform Our Religions, Cultures, And Governments.More Than Just A History Of Our Understanding Of God, This Book Is An Attempt To Get To The Root Of This Humanizing Impulse In Order To Develop A Universal Spirituality Whether You Believe In One God, Many Gods, Or No God At All, God A Human History Will Challenge The Way You Think About The Divine And Its Role In Our Everyday Lives.


10 thoughts on “God

  1. says:

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E Fuller Torrey It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating.In this short work, Reza Aslan similarly explores t...


  2. says:

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong s A History of God, this isof an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose We created God in our image, Aslan argues Using Adam and Eve as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what seems to have been intuitive the idea that the soul survives after death the notion of a three tiered universe heaven, Earth, and an underworld and animism, or the conviction that all things have a spirit Cave paintings Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong s A History of God, this isof an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose We created God in our image, Aslan argues Using Adam and Eve as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what seems to have been intuitive the idea that the soul survives after death the notion of a three tiered universe heaven, Earth, and an underworl...


  3. says:

    5 stuff Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing Also, I haven t encountered Reza Aslan before So my expectations were pretty low to start with.But then I started reading and was blown away This is such a strong book It is succinct, very balanced, logical and delightful to follow The author is a fantastic storyteller This is a non fiction story that will steal you away from your fiction TBR Th 5 stuff Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing Also, I haven t encountered Reza Aslan before So my expectations were pretty low to start with.But then I started reading and was blown away This is such a strong ...


  4. says:

    This book is well written and fascinating As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran The content however is very similar to Robert Wright s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong s history of God But I suppose the outcome is different Reza ends up in Sufism and Wright in secular Buddhism and Armstrong in Christian mysticism But as Azlan seems to say, it...


  5. says:

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them.Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though I ve read two of his books and one of them completely changed my viewpoint on things My religious studies professors sometimes talk about him to bring up various issues since he s a well known guy who studies religions and talks about them Not only that, but I ve often wondered how This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them.Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though I ve read two of his books and one of them completely changed my viewpoint on things My religious studies prof...


  6. says:

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest We all are So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe for the universe is God Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God Recognize that the knowledge of good and evil that the God of Genesis so feared humans might attain begins with the knowledge that good and evil are not me...


  7. says:

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end his extreme pantheism isn t all that different from atheism one is everything, every moment, every ...


  8. says:

    Each of Reza Aslan s previous books made a lasting impression on me God A Human History is no different It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature All the while, Aslan maintains a page turning narrative that shows how we have made sense of God throughout history by assigning human attributes to our divine beliefs Aslan starts with the first humans of Adam and Eve He explains how they performed burial rit Each of Reza Aslan s previous books made a lasting impression on me God A Human History is no different It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature All the while, Aslan maintains a page turning narrative that shows how we have made sense of God throughout history by assigning human attributes to our divine beliefs Aslan starts with the first humans of Adam and Eve He explains how they performed burial rituals that sought to embrace an afterworld where the deceased took on spiritual forms He shows how this idea of a transcendent soul in the afterlife has been part of every culture throughout human evolution Then, with the birth of agriculture, the humanization of gods intensified as it was fitting to transfer the powers of the gods from heaven to earth so that humans could fulfill the harvest With the Sumerians invention of writing, humans had the ability to chronicle history, and with the po...


  9. says:

    Read this once and then immediately read it again Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible That said, this book isn t quite what I expected It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God came to be What Aslan does focus on is compelling, but I was disappointed in the uneven treatment of world religions I would have likeddiscussion of Hinduism briefly discussed within the main body of the text a Read this once and then immediately read it again Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible That said, this book isn t quite what I expected It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God came to be What Aslan does focus on is compelling, but ...


  10. says:

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non contradiction Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own thoughts I believe in some circles he would be considered thoughtful, but for a philosophical, historical, believer in God I felt the book was a waste of my time.He describes conversion as an opinion change and has o The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non contradiction Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own thoughts I believe in some circles he would be considered thoughtful, but for a philosophical, historical, believer in God I felt the book was a waste of my time.He describes conversion as an opinion change and has obviously never understood or experienced regeneration Aslan is unfortunately a product of ethical relativism which is permeating our colleges and universities I truly wish he would examine his own thinking based on the laws of logic, because he does good research, and writes well.Aslan never gets to the philosophical root of creation, never addresses the mind body unity And never ...


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *